History

APPINO PRODUCTIONS began as House of Dames, a nonprofit theatre company founded in 1993 by Nikki Appino.

“Each of writer-director Appino’s pieces has had its own singular style. But running through much of her original work, from the visually grand Djinn to the more intimate Invisible Ink and Before the Comet Comes are the currents of melancholy, humor and a human-scale approach to epic subjects.”
Misha Berson, Seattle Times

Club Diamond had its world premiere at the Under the Radar Festival at the Public Theater this past January. It was developed in part at the Sundance TheaterMakers Lab and at the Sundance Lab at MassMoca.

APPINO PRODUCTIONS, now located in Philadephia has a new 4000 square foot warehouse/studio called the Glass Factory.

2016: Club Diamond plays at the Under The Radar Festival at the Public Theatre in NYC.

2014/15: The American Rimpoche has its world premiere in NYC. Workshops for Club Diamond at JACK and Hell’s A Fable at the Glass Factory in Philadelphia.

2012/13: Nikki begins two collaborations with composer Philip Glass, one for his new Glass Center and the other,  The American Rimpoche, about the life of Gelek Rimpoche and the coming of Tibetan Buddhism to the West.

2008/9: Appino Productions start shooting A Girl’s Gotta Ride, part one of a four-part docuseries about the contemporary culture of rodeo in the United States.

2007: Appino produces and directs White Tara, a one-hour film documenting a spiritual teaching by Tibetan Buddhist lama Gelek Rimpoche.

2004: Nikki produces and directs the national tour of singer-songwriter and composer Robin Holcomb’s O, Say a Sunset, a multimedia stage show based on the life and letters of environmentalist Rachael Carson.

Nikki closes House of Dames in Seattle and starts Appino Productions in New York City.

2003: The world premiere of Appino’s Before the Comet Comes plays at the Empty Space Theatre, in Seattle, Washington.

[Before the Comet Comes]…is textually dynamic, and rooted in the experiences of real people. Pervious productions have earned [Appino] a reputation for being a pioneer of impassioned performance that speaks volumes about the human experience, not just ideas.” David Perez, Tablet

2002: Appino’s Invisible Ink: Destiny and the Dance of Mata Hari premieres at Seattle’s On the Boards Contemporary Performing Arts Center.

2000: House of Dames returns to Sand Point Naval Base with Rain City Rollers, a musical performed on roller skates conceived and directed by Appino.

“If director Nikki Appino should ever decide to abandon the theater, she could make a lot of money coordinating and subverting such Dome-sized spectacles as monster-truck rallies, rock concerts, and wrestling matches. If you doubt me, you haven’t seen Rain City Rollers.” John Longenbaugh, Seattle Weekly

1998-1999: House of Dames produces Appino’s play Lazarus and Dark Night of the Soul for the Northwest New Works Series.

1997: Appino creates and co-produces Djinn, a multimedia event adapted from Alain Robbe-Grillet’s novel. American Theater Magazine described the production, which was performed in a 25,000-square-foot warehouse on the decommissioned Sand Point Naval Base in Seattle, as having “a power far beyond words.”

Djnn is a richly theatrical exploration of space, time and consciousness. Director Appino and her collaborators have concocted an incredibly haunting and thrilling theater event. Djinn is replete with theatrical ingenuity.” Jeffrey Eric Jenkins , Seattle Post Intelligencer

1995: House of Dames develops and produces the short films threshold and Thibadeaux Sally, which played to festival audiences in Seattle, San Francisco, and New York City.

1993: Appino produces, co-writes and co-directs the play Subrosa. This theater piece garnered national attention and continues to be cited as a landmark for contemporary performance in Seattle.

“In its wild, irreverent and breathless way, Subrosa sprang from the same impulse as Plato’s Symposium.” Roger Downey, American Theatre Magazine